What I am reading right now: “Age of Opportunity” by Laurence Steinberg

The new science of adolescent development: why it’s important for public health I have been working in the area of adolescent health recently – mostly in the context of innovations focused on life skills education (actually, sex education). I am really enjoying figuring out how to best reach these kids (you can read more about […]

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Best Monitoring and Evaluation Resources

When I design an M&E framework or put together M&E tools – I really like to share key documents with my client to give a background briefing and ensure we are on the same page. In addition, having a cache of key documents handy is helpful to access templates, find standardized indicators, or check technical […]

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Busting Silos and Oyster Pots: How to Combat Organizational Fragmentation

A Review of the Silo Effect by Gillian Tett Whatever health systems problem I am analyzing, in whatever state, country or region, all have one thing in common: they are created against a backdrop of a fragmented health system. The background section of every report I read or write seems to contain the words “in […]

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Educated Girls Rule the World

What is the best way to empower women and improve health outcomes?                                     We know that the most effective way out of poverty is to empower women. It works in all contexts; Bangladesh, Uganda, Thailand. Empowering women is a […]

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I Went to My First Hackathon (..and my team won)

Last weekend I went to my first hackathon, with little idea of what to expect. CAMTECH – a program based in the Massachussetts General Hospital – ran its third Jugaadathon in Bangalore from the 26th to the 28th June. The focus was on maternal and child health – and it brought together doctors, public health […]

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NEW RULES for documentation

One of the things that breaks my heart in public health and development is the big fat report that no one reads (not on the scale of IMR and MMR – but still). It’s a waste of time, resources and paper. It is – in short – a mistake – and it is an easily […]

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Personal Health Apps: Making you Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger

Personal health apps offer the opportunity to better manage your health and the possibility of surveillance.   Personal health apps hold a lot of promise for those with chronic conditions that require constant monitoring – such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. They can help people monitor the health of elderly parents or other loved ones […]

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Epic Measures

A book about the measurement of Disability Adjusted Life-Years (DALY) and the Global Burden of Disease   Calculating the global burden of disease – a measure of what ails and kills whom, everywhere, is no small feat. Epic Measures is the story of Chris Murray and colleagues developed the DALY and measured the global burden […]

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Frameworks to Assess Health Information Systems

This blog post was written with support and inputs from Nehal Jain and Vunnava Rao who have extensive experience deploying PRISM and Routine DQA respectively. **Updated to include the HRIS assessment toolkit (see below)   According to the WHO, health information is one of the key building blocks of a health system. Getting routine health […]

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Social networks: a tool to promote best practices

  Previously I have written about the power of social networks to affect health status – and the importance of factoring that in to any bchaviour change effort.     But of course, social networks don’t just affect health status, they affect everything – your career, your choice of life partner, where you live…actually everything. […]

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